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PureAcaiBerry

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

About


Thiamine can't be stored in the body, cooking at high temperatures destroys it and as it is water soluble it can leach from foods during cooking. To preserve the thiamine in foods, cook food over low temperatures in as small an amount of water for the shortest time possible. Steaming and microwaving keep losses to a minimum and often preserve the natural flavour, too.

Eating too much processed and refined foods like white flour and white sugar can deplete vitamin B1. Heavy drinking prevents vitamin B1 being absorbed from food.

What is it used for?


Vitamin B1 is essential for assisting the body to convert food into energy; it keeps your nerves in good condition and is associated with preventing the growth of cataracts in the eye and preventing the development of arthritis. It may help treat depression and memory loss.

Where do we get it?


Viatmin B1 can be obtained from whole grains, sunflower seeds, seafood, pork/bacon, beans, potatoes and nuts

How much?

The amount of thiamine your body requires depends on the number of calories you eat, particularly the calories you get from carbohydrates. The body requires 0.5 mg of thiamine for every 1,000 calories (assuming an average intake of carbohydrates). Thiamine intake should be at least 1.0 mg per day even if your total calorie intake is less than 2,000. By increasing your intake of carbohydrates, you also increase your need for thiamin, but your intake of thiamin usually increases, too.

The RDA for thiamin is 1.2 mg for men and 1.1 mg for women. A varied, well-balanced diet easily supplies the thiamine needed.



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